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Category Archives: Weapon Related Offenses

Do I really need to hire a criminal attorney?


Stylized arrest.

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Assault, DWI, theft, weapons charges? Do I really need to hire a criminal defense attorney to defend me or can I defend myself?

You do not have to hire a criminal attorney to defend you if you have been charged with a misdemeanor or felony — the better question is should you?  The bottom line is yes, you really should.  Sometimes, even when faced with a minor crime such as a traffic violation (class C misdemeanor) – the most important thing you need to consider is do you want this charge on your permanent record?

In today’s competitive job market it is difficult, to say the least, to secure employment even if you have a sterling reputation.  Almost all potential employers will tell you that even if you are lucky enough to make it as a candidate for the job, just one negative item on your background check can and most likely will eliminate you from being considered for the job.

If that is the case for just a class C misdemeanor, consider what implications a DWI or a felony charge will have on your record.  Every employer considers factors such as ethics and liability when hiring a new employee.  They may not be able to obtain insurance for you if you have a DWI or other charges on your record.  If an employer is ever sued and the complainant presents that an employee has a criminal record, it can result in the case being lost (even if the case is based on trumped-up allegations)  All of these factors will weigh against you during the hiring process, making your chances of obtaining a good job very slim.

So think carefully before you walk into a courtroom and face the judge alone.  Criminal defense attorneys that have been in business for a long time, such as Mark Morales & Associates, are in and out of these courtrooms daily.  They know the law, they know the process and they know how to win your case…. Do you?

You can call and get a completely free consultation before you make a decision that will effect the rest of your life.  You can also call and find out how to have a criminal charge removed (expunged) from your record if you or another attorney were unable to prove your innocence in a court of law.

 

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UCW or Possession of Prohibited Weapon


brass knuckles
Image via Wikipedia

Although Texas is considered a gun friendly state, it is unlawful to possess or carry many types of weapons in the Lone Star State. The laws concerning carrying a weapon can often be confusing and puzzling. This article is to help clarify those laws by explaining what it means to be charged with possession of a prohibited weapon or unlawfully carrying a weapon as we frequently handle these types of cases in Williamson, Travis, Hays, Collin, Tarrant, and Dallas Counties. Under Texas Penal Code § 46.02, it is a Class A misdemeanor for someone to intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly carry on or about his person a handgun, illegal knife or a club.

Examples of illegal knives and clubs include:

  • a single-edged knife with a blade length in excess of 5 ½ inches
  • a double-edged knife, a sword, or a spear
  • a club or anything made or adapted to strike someone and cause serious injury.

A weapon must be found on or about your person in order for you to be charged with Unlawfully Carrying a Weapon. The weapon must be within your reach without physically having to change your position. What this means is that you cannot be charged if a weapon was simply found somewhere in your vehicle, such as your trunk, if you are sitting in or driving your car. This only applies to weapons that are legal to carry in Texas. On the other hand, some weapons are illegal to own or have in your possession at all.

Some weapons that are illegal to own in Texas are:

  • switchblade knives (including butterfly knives),
  • brass knuckles
  • sawed-off firearms
  • short-barreled firearms,
  • explosive devices and
  • machine guns

If you are arrested for unlawfully carrying a weapon or possession of a prohibited weapon, your weapon will most likely be taken from you and placed into evidence. If your case is dismissed or you are acquitted of the charge, it is possible to get your weapon back. As long as the weapon is not illegal, the judge may order the return of the weapon to you once it is released from evidence. However, depending on the outcome of the case it is also possible that the judge may order that the weapon be destroyed.

Possible punishments for unlawfully carrying of a weapon or being found in possession of a prohibited weapon include:

  • up to one year in county jail
  • a fine of up to $4,000
  • and possibly two years of post-conviction community supervision or
  • deferred adjudication with the requirement to complete up to 200 community service hours

If the charge is unlawfully carrying a weapon in a weapon-free zone, the offense is treated as a state-jail felony. If the offense is committed on any premise that is licensed or issued a permit for the sale of alcoholic beverages, the offense is then considered a third degree felony.

It is always under unfortunate circumstances that people must contact a criminal defense attorney but if you find yourself in that position, make sure you find an attorney that you can trust to do everything possible to help fight for you and win your case. If you have any questions about what constitutes Unlawfully Carrying a Weapon or have been charged with Possession of a Prohibited Weapon, feel free to leave a comment or visit us on Facebook and fill out a free case evaluation form with no obligation.

 

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