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Types of Assault Charges in Texas


Fighting Cats

Image via Wikipedia

It does not take much for an altercation or argument to escalate and involve the police.  Some
people may believe that an assault charge consists of a violent fight between two individuals but this is not always the case.   In Texas, assault can include an attempt to hurt someone physically.  In some
instances, prosecutors have decided that the slightest touch is enough to file assault charges.  Additionally, the law does not require the alleged victim to sustain an actual injury.

There are several different
types of assault charges including but not limited to:

We could probably write a novel discussing the different types of assault charges and what they all mean and how each charge may come about.  As a result, we thought it might be helpful just to provide a general overview of assault charges.

Assault charges can range from Class C misdemeanors (e.g. assault by contact) to a 1st degree felony; all cases will vary based on the facts and criminal history of each defendant. On the lower end of the spectrum (Class C misdemeanor), the punishment may result in implementation of fines, attendance of anger-management or marriage counseling classes, or deferred adjudication.  Higher level misdemeanors could result in jail time or probation.  Felony cases may result in probation or prison time.  Depending on your criminal history and the actual charge, you may be eligible for special programs like the Pre-Trial Intervention Program in
Williamson County that could result in a dismissal of your case.

Assault Family Violence

We handle a large number of Assault Family Violence cases, both misdemeanours and felonies.  These
types of cases typically involve family members but may also include former spouses, domestic partners, roommates, and present/former boyfriends/girlfriends.

Frequently, assault family violence cases involve police officers responding to a call about a disturbance.  The police will likely talk to both parties and make an arrest based on whose story they believe or what the evidence
indicates.  Unfortunately, sometimes, the person arrested is actually the victim and not the aggressor.  Other times, a mere accusation of violence may be enough for a criminal case to be filed. Sometimes, penalties for assault family violence may be harsher than normal assault cases and may result in temporary or permanent loss of parental rights.

Unfortunately, having an assault family violence conviction on your record can be used to deny child custody and limit your visitation rights if you are undergoing a divorce or other child custody hearings.

Affidavits of Non-Prosecution

Unlike in TV shows and movies, an assault case cannot be dropped in Texas simply because the victim requests that the charges be dropped.  Instead, the right to drop the case belongs to the prosecutor and judge.
However, not all hope is lost.  Frequently, criminal defense attorneys help the victims in assault cases prepare Affidavits of Non-Prosecution, which express the victims wish that the case be dismissed and may shed some light on the altercation or argument that led to the arrest and filing of charges. While these affidavits can’t guarantee that a case is dismissed, they certainly help in persuading the prosecutor to dismiss the case or reduce the charges.

Protective Orders and Court Ordered Injunctions

In some cases of assault, the prosecutor will request that a court impose temporary protective orders or an injunction to place restrictions on contact between the accused and the victim, or in the case of assault family
violence on the other family members. Protective orders may vary, ranging from no contact with the alleged victim, which frequently results in the accused having to find another place to live until the case is resolved or the protective order lifted, or could result in a temporary loss of child custody.  A violation of a Court Ordered Protective order is also a serious criminal matter and may result in additional criminal charges filed against the accused.

Aggravated Assault & Assault with a Deadly Weapon

Aggravated assault consists of two different charges:  aggravated assault causing serious bodily injury and assault with a deadly weapon, both of which are typically second degree felonies.  An aggravated assault
causing serious bodily injury occurs when during the course of an assault the victim was seriously injured.  It is
escalated from a mere slap to the face to a more severe resulting injury.  Assault with deadly weapon occurs when the accused is alleged to have exhibited a deadly weapon during the commission of the assault.  Deadly weapons can include but are not limited to:  baseball bats, BB guns, bottles, clubs, drugs, firearms, knives, motor vehicles, nail guns, and even dustpans and hot water.

However, if you are accused of committing an aggravated assault against someone with whom you have a domestic relationship, or against a security guard, witness, police officer, or public official the charge may be
elevated to a first degree felony.

We are experienced as criminal defense attorneys in handling all types of assault cases and are able
to help whether you are being charged with assault by contact or assault with a deadly weapon.  We have successfully handled various forms of assault cases and are here to help.

List of Common Texas Assault Charges

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You Have the Right to Remain Silent


Right to SilenceIt cannot be emphasized enough that in the United States, a person gives up Fourth and Fifth Amendment rights the moment they begin cooperating with police in any way prior to arrest. These rights technically cannot be reclaimed after an arrest has been made and Miranda rights have been read. this is true because police do not have to advise a person of his/her rights until after he/she incriminates themselves and/or are arrested. In other words, if the person cooperates prior to being arrested, then they have surrendered most of the rights of which the police are advising that arrestee when they are reading them their Miranda rights.

Here is an excerpt from Wikipedia about protecting your right’s that helps to illustrate this point:

 “In the U.S., the only way for one to protect one’s rights fully is to refuse answering any questions beyond giving one’s name and identifying papers if requested and to refuse giving consent to anything (such as a search) prior to one’s arrest. Law enforcement officials in the United States rely heavily upon the subtle intimidation of their position and power and the ignorance of citizens to their rights in order to make people incriminate themselves. Police do not have to tell civilians the truth on any subject. They can make any promises and claims they like in order to induce a person to incriminate herself or himself or to allow the police to perform a search, and police are not bound by anything they promise to suspects or witnesses (i.e. promises of aid or protection).United States citizens must know their rights in order to avoid losing them by inadvertently giving them away.” – Taken from: Wikipedia “Right to Silence”

In other words the rights guaranteed by the Fourth and Fifth Amendment are not automatically invoked by the accused. In fact the opposite is true. If a person does not actively invoke their rights then their rights are automatically surrendered. This is why it is imperative that anyone who is arrested or accused of a crime should exercise their right to remain silent! Thankfully, not answering any questions asked by the police is not considered incriminating in and of itself in the U.S. legal system. Therefore, a person who finds themselves arrested and/or accused of a crime in the U.S. should answer any police questions with a polite request for an attorney. When interrogated simply and politely say “I would like to speak with a lawyer” and contact a criminal defense attorney as soon as it is possible.

This advice may sound counter-intuitive. Especially since we are taught all of our lives that the police exist to protect and serve us. Against these long established beliefs of police benevolence it is important to remember what are trained to do with people they arrest or accuse of a crime. Police officers are trained to investigate and gather evidence to build a case against the people they arrest or accuse of a crime. If you are arrested the police are not trained to be your priest, pastor, personal coach, or counselor. In short, if you are under arrest the police are not your friend.

Further compounding this issue is the fact that police officers are not infallible. They are flesh and blood human beings who make mistakes just like the rest of us. As such it is all too common for the police to bend the rules and take certain statements out of context in order to gain the upper hand and get a conviction. The police know that most people willingly provide them with the evidence needed for a conviction through confessions and statements taken during the interrogation process. It is for this reasons that while it is always a good idea to have a respectful attitude when dealing with the police, it is equally important to answer any questions they have in a controlled setting with access to competent legal advice.

After all, the State of Texas and United States Attorney’s Office take advantage of their huge budget by being able to have access to a large staff of lawyers, police officers, and crime lab experts to help prosecute their cases. This means that it is highly unlikely that a person who is accused of a crime will be able to challenge the government’s case without competent legal representation. Without an attorney the jury will more often than not accept whatever evidence the prosecutor produces.

 
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Posted by on June 7, 2011 in Legal Rights

 

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